Perodua Overseas

Perodua’s logo

For Proton Overseas, click here.

Hi there, welcome to my website ! Some of you may recall our last article, Proton Overseas, which was surprisingly well received, achieving over 3,000 hits in just 3 days. Due to popular demand, I hereby present Perodua Overseas, essentially a Perodua version of our previous article.

The purpose of this article is to raise Malaysian awareness on the presence and success of Perodua in foreign markets.

Almost 18 years have passed since the launch of the first Perodua car, the Perodua Kancil. Since then, multiple models have spawned from the Perodua factories and scored buyers all over the world.

As in our last article, I only chose the very best photos for maximum satisfaction. Enjoy !

DISCLAIMER : I take absolutely no credit for these photos. All credit goes to the original owners.

Perodua in the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom is a major market for Perodua. The company entered the United Kingdom with help from the other Malaysian automobile company, Proton. Perodua cars were sold here as cheaper and smaller alternatives to the Proton range. Demand was higher than expected. Perodua eventually broke off from Proton and officially established the brand in the UK. Perodua sold many thousands of cars here in the 1990s. However, sales plummeted with the turn of the century. Perodua sold only 761 cars in the UK for 2010.

Perodua is not very well known in Britain. However, Perodua did feature on several episodes of Top Gear; mainly as a comical scapegoat together with Proton. The company suffers from a poor image here, almost exclusively due to the bashing from influential British media, such as the aforementioned Top Gear.

Perodua desperately needs a major overhaul in terms of reputation and marketing strategy if sales are to improve in the United Kingdom. The company also wishes to use the UK ( Cyprus and Malta ) as stepping stones toward greater continental Europe.

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kenari in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kenari in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kenari in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kenari in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kenari in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa UK ad

Perodua Kelisa in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kelisa in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kelisa in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kelisa in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kelisa in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi LE Jet & Sport Silver in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi LE Sport Silver in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi LE Wolfrace in the United Kingdom

Perodua MyVi LE Wolfrace in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa rally car in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kancil/ Nippa rally cars in the United Kingdom

Perodua Kelisa rally car in the United Kingdom

Perodua in Singapore

Singapore is major market for Perodua. However, the company is not successful here and sales are extremely low if compared to rival brands such as Hyundai and Daewoo. Most budget concious Singaporeans opt for Korean cars over ( the cheaper ) Malaysian cars.

Many Perodua owners in Singapore appear to be strangely fanatical, often adding modifications and whatnot to improve the looks of their cars ( as you may observe in the photos below ).

Perodua Kenari in Singapore

Perodua Kenari in Singapore

Perodua Kelisa in Singapore

Perodua Kenari in Singapore

Perodua Kelisa in Singapore

Perodua Kenari in Singapore

Perodua Kelisa in Singapore

Perodua Kenari in Singapore

Perodua MyVi in Singapore

Perodua in Brunei

Small volumes of Perodua cars are sold here in Brunei. Despite the small market size, many Perodua cars have been sold here over the past few years.

Perodua Kelisa in Brunei

Perodua Kelisa in Brunei

Perodua Viva in Brunei

Perodua Kancil in Brunei, with another Kancil and a Proton Persona in the background, 2012

Perodua Kancil in Brunei, with another Kancil and a Proton Persona in the background, 2012

Perodua in Malta

Perodua cars are sold in Malta. It’s not a particularly big market, but one which matters dearly to Perodua.

Perodua Rusa in Malta

Perodua Rusa in Malta

Perodua Kelisa in Malta

Perodua Rusa in Malta

Perodua in Cyprus

Cyprus is a crucial market for Perodua. However, only a small number of Peroduas are sold here.

Perodua Kembara in Cyprus

Perodua Kembara in Cyprus

Perodua Kembara in Cyprus

Perodua in Mauritius

Mauritius is another core Perodua market. Perodua is somewhat successful here, despite the small market size.

Perodua Kelisa in Mauritius

Perodua Kelisa in Mauritius

Perodua Viva in Mauritius

Perodua in Egypt

Egypt is a major market for Perodua. Egyptian Perodua owners seem to be highly enthusiastic about their cars, as you may deduce from the photos below.

Perodua Kelisa (modified) in Egypt

Perodua Kelisa (modified) in Egypt

Perodua Kelisa (modified) in Egypt

A group of Perodua Kelisas (modified) in Egypt

Perodua in Syria

Syria is a crucial market for Perodua.

Perodua Kelisa in Syria

Perodua in Lebanon

Lebanon is another important market for Perodua.

Perodua Kelisa in Lebanon

Perodua in Qatar

Qatar is a minor market for Perodua.

Perodua Kelisa in Qatar

Perodua in Nepal

Nepal is another small market for Perodua.

Perodua Kancil in Nepal

Perodua in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is a minor but crucial market for Perodua.

Perodua Viva in Sri Lanka

Perodua Viva in Sri Lanka

Perodua Viva in Sri Lanka

Perodua in Indonesia

Perodua does business in Indonesia through its business associate, Daihatsu. The little Japanese company also provides models for the Malaysian market, which are then rebadged and altered under the Perodua name. Technically, Perodua never did and probably never will make home grown cars; all Perodua models are Daihatsu or Toyota cars under the hood.

However, this is not the case in Indonesia. Here, the new Perodua MyVi is rebadged under the Daihatsu name and sold as the Daihatsu Sirion. The external appearance is identical to the Perodua MyVi sold in Malaysia. Thanks to the Daihatsu badge, the MyVi ( or the Sirion ) sells well in the market.

Daihatsu Sirion/ Perodua MyVi ad in Indonesia

Daihatsu Sirion/ Perodua MyVi in Indonesia

Daihatsu Sirion/ Perodua MyVi in Indonesia

Daihatsu Sirion/ Perodua MyVi in Indonesia

Daihatsu Sirion/ Perodua MyVi in Indonesia

In my honest opinion, I find the existence of Perodua quite irrelevant. In my eyes, Perodua exists simply as a form of circumvention for import taxes imposed on Daihatsu and Toyota cars in Malaysia. In other words, Perodua exists only for the sake of profits and blind national pride. While it is true that Perodua sold more cars than that of its rival ( Proton ) for many years in succession, it doesn’t make the company any more successful, in my opinion. Unlike Proton, Perodua is still the same as it was 18 years ago; Malaysia’s premier Daihatsu rebadging agent. Proton, at least, came out with Malaysia’s first true home grown car, the Proton Waja in 2000, 15 years since the launch of the first Malaysian car, the Proton Saga. Some will argue that the later Proton cars from 2000 to 2006 lacked in quality, which is true for the most part. Since Perodua cars are mostly Japanese made, quality and reliability is higher than that of Proton. However, since the appointment the new Managing Director, Dato’ Sri Haji Syed Zainal Abidin B. Syed Mohamed Tahir in 2006, Proton took a swift turn in the right direction. The company made a major comeback in early 2011, triumphing Perodua as Malaysia’s best selling automotive brand, thanks in part to the launch of various new models, such as the award winning Proton Exora, Persona and Saga. Perodua, which depended heavily on Daihatsu experienced a drop in sales due to supply disruptions caused by the March 2011 Japanese Earthquake crisis.

The moral of the story ? Perseverance and a progressive mindset wins at the end of the day. I cannot think highly enough of Perodua, with their old, incompetent way of thinking. Likewise, I do not hail Proton either. However, my respect for Proton has grown over the years. The company has been trying hard since 2007 and it’s becoming ever more obvious that Proton is doing it right, for once. The way I look at it, Perodua only sits and waits for orders from big brother Daihatsu in Japan. Daihatsu does all the work, while Perodua slaps on their badge and a new bumper or two. If and when Daihatsu goes down under, Perodua will suffer inevitably, without the external support. This theory has been proven during the 2011 Japanese Earthquake crisis. Proton may not be prefect, but at least they’re trying, and trying hard. I feel Proton is doing the morally right thing, by making their own cars as opposed to badge engineering Mitsubishi cars likes they did in the past. Some will argue that the Proton Inspira ( a rebadged Mitsubishi Lancer ) contradicts this statement; which is absolutely true, but hey, the Inspira is just one car in Proton’s line- up which is not home grown. The Satria Neo, Exora, Saga, Waja, Persona, Savvy, they’re all 95% Proton ( 5% Lotus ), whereas Perodua’s MyVi, Viva and Alza are pretty much 75% Japanese and 25% Malaysian. If the majority of Perodua cars are home grown, I would totally support Perodua without second thoughts, even if one or two models are rebadged Daihatsus. It’s fine, because in that case, Perodua would be trying. However, I doubt Perodua will ever make their own cars. The company will forever suffer from an identity crisis, and will without a doubt fail to distinguish itself from the crowd of manufacturers on the international level.

Alternatively, Proton and Perodua could be integrated into a single entity for better results. This has been the case with Hyundai and Kia of South Korea. Today, the two brands are among the most successful in the world, even more so than Japanese and European brands.

Proton and Perodua

I do not wish to sound biased by supporting only Proton and not Perodua. It’s nothing too personal, I just believe that supporting Proton is morally right. They are trying to make their own cars, to compete not only in Malaysia, but on an international level as well. I believe that supporting Perodua is morally wrong. The company only seeks to gain profit by rebadging Daihatsu/ Toyota cars to compete on the national level for the sake of national pride. Basically, I believe that Perodua buyers are only interested in functionality, whereas Proton owners are upholding morality. This is just my personal opinion, and I know not everyone will agree with me.

That’s it for today’s article guys. I hope you enjoyed it. I’d like to make it clear once more that I take absolutely no credit for these photos. All credit goes to the original owners. These photos are meant solely for illustrative purposes only. Furthermore, Perodua cars may be present in more countries than those listed above, please keep this in mind.

Thanks for reading !

Want to contribute more photos of overseas Perodua cars to this article ? Feel free to e-mail any and all of your best photos to aero.nation@yahoo.com ! If you include a link to your blog or website together with your photos, I will make sure to include the URL link in the credits below as well. 🙂

Credits

  • Various sources for the photos
  • Various sources for the data
  • crthompson – For 3 Brunei photos

– Updated December 10th 2012 – Added more countries and photos

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8 responses to “Perodua Overseas

  1. Pingback: Proton Overseas | a4rzero

  2. I was once a Perodua supporter due to the poor quality (fit and fittings) of proton vehicles from year 2000 to 2006. When they launch the Persona in 2007, Proton said that the car will sell well like tha Myvi and i was laughing at them thinking that they will never sell well due to their quality until one day a friend pick me up in a Persona, i was amazed at the comfort, sound proofing as well as interior quality of the Persona compared to the old myvi.. From that time onwards i support Proton more than Perodua… Anyway i really hope Perodua will build their own cars someday and compete in the international market..

    • Hi BW,

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I agree with your statements. Anyway, we’ll see how things turn out in the next 5 years. Let’s hope for the best.

  3. Pingback: Proton International Sales | a4rzero _ Aero

  4. Haha. That red Rally Perodua Nippa was mine! 7500+ miles from the UK to Mongolia over 35 days without a single mechanical issue. Amazing little cars.

    • Hi Dan, really sorry for the late reply.

      What a coincidence ! I’m glad to hear about that. I have to agree as well, they’re very very reliable cars. I still can’t believe you drove 7500+ miles in 35 days though, that’s amazing !

  5. Proton cars from 2007 onwards are all better than any Peroduas including the latest Myvi in terms of comfort, driving quality, body build, interior quality and etc. Those who condemn blindly at Proton cars are those who never own one or even sat in one.. Perodua should really follow Proton’s footsteps and create their own cars instead of rebadging all the time

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